Friday, January 4, 2013

Postcard from London: The Codebreaker

{One of the first general-purpose programmable computers, based on Alan Turing's 1945 design}
This is my last London post. A current Science Museum exhibit highlights the life of Alan Turing, famous for his WWII codebreaking work at Bletchley Park and pioneer of the modern computer. Sadly, Turing was treated horribly, forced to take hormones to "cure" being gay. He died aged 41 of apparent suicide.
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A brief but lovely article, humanizing Turing, was published by Princeton University when he was voted one of its most influential alumni (Turing received his PhD from Princeton in 1938).

20 comments:

a.s.m. said...

¡Buenísima foto! Muy bien tomada, además de la buena información de tu texto.
Un saludo, Ángel

a.s.m. said...

La foto de la escalera como un elemento arquitectónico esta magníficamente fotografiada. “The Foundling Museum”
Un saludo, Ángel

Paul B said...

The Science Museum along with the Natural History Museum were some of my favourite haunts as a boy staying at my mothers family home in London. Turing has it seems to me at long last found some of the recognition he deserves.

LOLfromPasa said...

Great photo, Lulu. How neat to find a Princeton link here. Did you know Turing went to Princeton? or was it a surprise to discover.

Tanya said...

what a sad short life he must have lived :(

have a great weekend lulu!

Duncan D. Horne - the Kuantan blogger said...

Wow, that is something!
Duncan In Kuantan

PerthDailyPhoto said...

I remember seeing a movie about Bletchley Park once Lulu, the history of the activities that went on there during the war was fascinating. Thank goodness we've come a long way from the narrow mindedness of alternative lifestyle choices now hey!

Adele said...

What an interesting, amazing life he led! So, so sad that it was felt that he needed to be "cured" of who he was...

Jackie/Jake said...

What a lovely blog I just found you by way of Skywatch Friday and am your latest follower!

Stefan Jansson said...

A brilliant man.

William Kendall said...

I've heard his story before, particularly in relation to the Second World War. One of the brilliant men of the age, and a tragedy taking his own life.

LONDONLULU said...

Thanks for the thoughtful comments - Turing's story really was a tragic one, he made so many contributions. @LOLfromPasa, I learned of the Princeton connection only last year, shortly after moving here! @PerthDailyPhoto - yes, we've come a long way since then!
@Jackie/Jake - thank you & thanks so much for stopping by!

Hilda said...

And I thought it was a wine rack! LOL, my mind's still on holiday mode.

It's sad how many brilliant people led miserable lives because of discrimination. Unfortunately, it still happens too often even now.

Peter said...

Love Hilda's comment about a wine rack. A beautiful post on the work of a genius, thankyou.

Randy said...

That is amazing!

Norma Beishir said...

Thank you for this, Lulu. I love blogs that provide striking images and thoughtful stories behind the images.

Petrea Burchard said...

Turing was a genius, abused for his sexual preference. There's no way to make restitution to him now, but perhaps to his memory.

Hilda, you made me laugh!

LONDONLULU said...

Thanks so much (loved Hilda's comment too:) - so true, Petrea, we can never make it up to him, only his memory.

Cloudia said...

Yes, let's humanize the dear genius; he is no foot baller, or singer, but perhaps her is a worthy fellow for all that.


and YOU, you are a delight!


Aloha
from Honolulu,
Comfort Spiral
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EG CameraGirl said...

Scary looking machine.

How sad Turing died so young! I don't understand why so many humans try to homogenize others, even today.